Cost of Living

One of the big advantages of living in Hua Hin is the low cost of living. However, just how low depends largely on what kind of lifestyle you are planning to have. It is, of course, very difficult to generalise about what various people consider necessary or luxury, so the best we can offer is a rough guide, based on certain averages. Please remember that these are approximate estimates for reference purposes only, and so your own cost of living here may be somewhat different.

Classified by lifestyle

A new arrival`s initial outlay (furniture, car, etc.) differs greatly from case to case. The figures shown below are based on a married couple without children.

 

A new arrival`s initial outlay (furniture, car, etc.) differs greatly from case to case. The figures shown below are based on a married couple without children.

(All figures in Baht) Modest Comfortable Affluent
Estimated cost of living per month 20,790 53,800 146,900
Home rent8,00020,00050,000
Electricity5002,5004,000
Water100100200
TEL/Mobile telephone3005001,500
Internet access5007001,200
Cable/UBC Satellite TV3902,0002,500
Food expenses8,00020,00035,000
Entertainment (outside)2,0006,00030,000
Transport (taxi fares, etc.)1,0002,0006,000
MaidN/AN/A10,000
LaundryN/AN/A2,000
GardenerN/AN/A5,000

 

 

Modest lifestyle

What constitutes a modest lifestyle must differ greatly from case to case. One person`s necessity is another`s luxury! Some people can live very happily with much less than others, but it is doubtful if any foreigner could live truly acceptably on 10,000 baht a month — not for long, anyway! If one is suitably economical, it should be possible to live fairly nicely on around 15,000 baht or less. However, for many locals, 15,000 a month would certainly count as affluent. Also bear in mind that for new arrivals, there might indeed be a large gap between the local price and the foreigner`s price, but the more one becomes acclimatised, the smaller this gap becomes.

 

Having said that, let us say that a modest lifestyle would involve using a bike or the bus rather than a car or taxi, living in a townhouse or apartment in a quiet area (we do not recommend living downtown), living without a home Internet connection, using fans rather than air conditioning, mostly eating at home and spending little or nothing on alcohol.

Comfortable lifestyle


With a monthly budget of around 40,000 baht, life obviously improves quite a bit. One can choose a more spacious home, can dine out more often, and can do more with your leisure time. Such a lifestyle would be much closer to a `middle class` lifestyle in the West. Such a lifestyle would allow for using a motorbike rather than public transport, a 2- bedroom townhouse OR a 1- bedroom condominium, an ADSL (256kbps) connection at home, occasional use of an air conditioner, cable television (UBC), an occasional meal out, and an occasional drink at an outside bar, pub, etc.

 

Affluent lifestyle

There are several trains between Bangkok Hua Lamphong Station and Hua Hin each day, although most trains leave in the late afternoon and can get rather crowded. Due to there being only a single track for much of the route, the journey takes 4 hours or more.

 

All trains arrive/depart at Hua Hin`s picturesque station located at the top of Damnern Kasem Road, which is within walking distance of most downtown hotels. The fare varies, as there are four types of train, depending upon class and types of train.

 

From Hua Lamphong Station to Hua Hin Station Cost: approx 300 Baht (depending on types of train) Duration: 4 hours~

Rental costs — the lion`s share of monthly expenses

Looking at the above figures, you can easily see that home rental costs represent a very large percentage of any foreigner`s cost of living. Of course, rent also takes up a major share of Thai family budgets as well, but with property, there is often a big difference between Thai costs and foreign costs. After all, many foreigners, even the most frugal, would be unable to even consider living in what some locals might call home! However, this price gap can be greatly reduced by using local knowledge and expertise. This is where it might be wise to examine the difference between renting and buying. For example, compare buying a 100 m2townhouse in a nice area for 2 million baht with renting the same house for 20,000 baht. Renting can be expensive, especially for longer term stays. Also, compared with Bangkok, for example, there are far fewer foreigners renting property here, and less demand inevitably leads to a smaller market, meaning less choice. However, 30-year leases can be arranged for some quality homes, for those disinclined to make such a relatively large investment. Possibly you have read that a foreigner can`t buy a house or land here. Well, strictly speaking, that is true. However, an increasing number of foreigners DO own land and property (not just condos), as it is possible — albeit, slightly complicated. This is another area where local expertise is invaluable. For more information about the real estate market here and the procedures involved, etc. please refer to our Property pages.

Other prices — Daily necessities, etc.

For a more detailed guide to local prices for food and daily necessities, take a look at the table below. Please bear in mind that prices can and do fluctuate (due to season, availability, etc.). As can be seen, some items are much cheaper here, whereas a few items cost a bit more. Items that are usually cheaper here Vegetables, locally grown fruit, chicken, water, local restaurants, etc. Items that are only minimally different/equally pricedMotorcycles, petrol/gasoline and electricity, Internet connections, brand items and home electricals, milk and western food, etc. Items generally costing more here Motor cars, tissues (strange but true), imported alcohol and cheese, etc
ItemsGeneral Hua Hin price
(Thai baht)

As of October 2015
Jasmine rice (5 kg)265
Bread40
Egg (3)40
Milk (1L)45
Cola (1.25L pet bottle)25
Local vegetables (kg)From 40
Chicken (kg)From 70
BananasFrom 30
Fried Rice (Street vendor)35-40
Fried Rice (Restaurant)40-50
Fried Rice (A/C restaurant)80-120
Gy yahn (BBQ chicken - whole)140-160
Sugar (1 kg)24
Drinking water (500ML)7
Chang Beer (1 dozen large bottles)560
Chang Beer (350cc can)35
Toilet paper (12 rolls)139
Tissues (3 boxes)130
ADSL (10MB)1282
UBC satellite TV (Gold package)1568
Cable television (per month)300
Mobile phone SIM card (Valid for 1 month)300
Motorbike (100 - 125cc)From 52,000
Honda CR - V1,200,000 ~
Toyota Vios (Carolla)699,000 ~


Please Note:
Prices can vary widely depending on where you buy, etc.